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Interesting as an intellectual exercise, but seems a bit of a fail in actual execution. I keep looking at them and imagining how grungy they quickly would become as every one of his facets aquires dirt and is virtually uncleanable. I hope he keeps up the experiment, but I wouldn’t want to see them on a public building say for a while to come.
fastcompany:

Michael Hansmeyer is a Zurich architect who uses algorithms to generate absurdly complex structural columns. He recently created plastic 9 ft columns that each have about 16 million unique surfaces and no two columns—or even two surfaces—are the same. Take a look!

Interesting as an intellectual exercise, but seems a bit of a fail in actual execution. I keep looking at them and imagining how grungy they quickly would become as every one of his facets aquires dirt and is virtually uncleanable. I hope he keeps up the experiment, but I wouldn’t want to see them on a public building say for a while to come.

fastcompany:

Michael Hansmeyer is a Zurich architect who uses algorithms to generate absurdly complex structural columns. He recently created plastic 9 ft columns that each have about 16 million unique surfaces and no two columns—or even two surfaces—are the same. Take a look!

(via fastcompany)

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    Interesting as an intellectual exercise, but seems a bit of a fail in actual execution. I keep looking at them and...
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